Uruguay Football Team


Founded :1900
Captain : Diego Godín
Association : Asociación Uruguaya de Fútbol (AUF)
Head coach : Óscar Tabárez
Arenas/Stadiums : Estadio Centenario, Montevideo
Kit Colour Home / Away : Sky blue/White
FIFA Ranking : 9
 
Achievements:

World Cup:Appearances 12 (First in 1930),Best result: Champions, 1930 and 1950
Copa America:Appearances 45 (First in 1916),Best result: Champions, 1916, 1917, 1920, 1923, 1924, 1926, 1935, 1942, 1956, 1959, 1967, 1983, 1987, 1995 and 2011
Confederations Cup:Appearances 2 (First in 1997),Best result: Fourth Place, 1997 and 2013



About:

The Uruguay national football team represents Uruguay in international association football and is controlled by the Uruguayan Football Association, the governing body for football in Uruguay. The current head coach is Óscar Tabárez. The Uruguayan team is commonly referred to as La Celeste (The Sky Blue) or Charrúas. The Uruguayan team recently won the 2011 Copa América. They have won the Copa América 15 times, being the team that has won the tournament on most occasions. The team has won the FIFA World Cup twice, including the first World Cup in 1930 as hosts, defeating Argentina 4–2 in the final. They won their second title in 1950, upsetting host Brazil 2–1 in the final match, which received an attendance higher than any football match ever.

They have won the Gold Medals in football at the Summer Olympics twice, in 1924 and 1928 recognized by FIFA as World Cup, before the creation of the World Cup. Uruguay also won the 1980 Mundialito, a tournament among former World Cup champions. In total, Uruguay have won 20 official titles, a world record for the most international titles held by any country.

Background:

In 1901, Uruguay played against Argentina in their first ever match, a close contest won by Argentina 3–2. Prior to 1916, Uruguay played more than 30 matches, of which all but one were against Argentina. The inaugural Copa America provided Uruguay with more varied opposition. Victories over Chile and Brazil, along with a tie against Argentina, enabled Uruguay to win the tournament. The following year Uruguay hosted the competition, and retained the title by winning every game. The 1919 Copa América saw Uruguay's first defeat in the tournament, a 1–0 defeat in a playoff with Brazil which went to two periods of extra time, the longest Copa América match in history.

In 1924, the Uruguay team traveled to Paris to become the first South American team to compete in the Olympic Games. In contrast to the physical style of the European teams of the era, Uruguay played a style based around short passes, and won every game, defeating Switzerland 3–0 in the gold medal match. In the 1928 Summer Olympics, Uruguay went to Amsterdam to defend their title, again winning the gold medal after defeating Argentina 2–1 in the final. FIFA assumed the responsibility of the organization of the Football Games to be played by FIFA rules and the tournaments would be recognized as World Championships. It only happened twice (1924/1928 Summer Olympics Games) until the creation of its own FIFA World Championship, the FIFA World Cup, in 1930.

In 2010, however, a new generation of footballers, led by Luis Suárez, Diego Forlán and Edinson Cavani, formed a team considered to be Uruguay's best in the last four decades, catching international attention after finishing fourth in the 2010 World Cup. Uruguay opened the tournament with a goalless draw against France, followed by defeats of South Africa (3–0) in and Mexico (1–0) respectively, finishing at the top of their group with seven points. In the second round, they played South Korea, defeating them 2–1 with star striker Luis Suárez scoring a brace and earning Uruguay a spot in the quarter-finals for the first time since 1970. Against Ghana, the match finished 1–1, forcing the game into extra-time. Ghana nearly scored a winning goal but, to the outrage of the Ghanaians, Suárez purposely blocked the ball with his hand in the penalty area, earning him a red card. Ghana striker Asamoah Gyan missed the subsequent penalty, forcing the game to go into penalties where Uruguay would win 4–2, sending them into the last four. They played the Netherlands in the semifinals but were beaten 3–2. For the third-place match, they played Germany, again losing 3–2. This placed Uruguay in fourth place for the tournament, their best result in 40 years.

A year later, they won the Copa America for the first time in 16 years and broke the record for the most successful team in South America. Luis Suárez ended up as the Player of The Tournament

Squad:

Pos.

Player

GK

Fernando Muslera

GK

Martín Silva

GK

Martín Campaña

DF

Maxi Pereira

DF

Diego Godín (Captain)

DF

Álvaro Pereira

DF

José María Giménez

DF

Sebastián Coates

DF

Mathías Corujo

DF

Gastón Silva

DF

Federico Ricca

MF

Egidio Arévalo Ríos

MF

Álvaro González

MF

Nicolás Lodeiro

MF

Gastón Ramírez

MF

Carlos Sánchez

MF

Giorgian De Arrascaeta

MF

Matías Vecino

MF

Diego Laxalt

FW

Luis Suárez

FW

Edinson Cavani

FW

Cristhian Stuani

FW

Abel Hernández

FW

Diego Rolán